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<p>Drones can go to places where people can’t and see things the human eye can’t see, offering operators vital information about the site.</p>
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Drones can go to places where people can’t and see things the human eye can’t see, offering operators vital information about the site.

Droning in

More and more miners are using drones for a variety of applications, maximizing the potential of the mine while minimizing potential hazards for employees.

Mines around the world are increasingly investing in drones and related technology, and it’s easy to see why. At Bingham Canyon in the US state of Utah, managers used drones to map out the entire open pit mine, allowing them to identify potential hazards for employees and analyze the risks.

This technology can be used to maximize the potential of any mine, while minimizing risk to employee health. Drones can go to places where people can’t, see things the human eye can’t see and give operators vital information about where they’re working and where they should be focusing their efforts. As costs come down, the technology is more commonplace, and many mines have dedicated drone pilots.