Dear reader,
You may have noticed that we’ve changed domains from Minestories to Solid Ground online, a name that more inclusively reflects our broad range of solutions for the mining and rock excavation industries. Rest assured, you’ll still be able to read and watch the ground-breaking content you’ve come to expect. Thanks for visiting.

<p>Three new uranium-rich minerals discovered represent a small and unique slice of the earth’s crust.</p>
Show captionHide caption

Three new uranium-rich minerals discovered represent a small and unique slice of the earth’s crust.

Three new uranium-rich materials found

In Utah, three uranium-rich minerals were found growing on the walls of a mine, which will help us understand more about the chemical element.

American scientist Travis Olds has found three new uranium-rich secondary minerals growing on the walls of a mine near the Red Canyon region of Utah. All three specimens – leesite, leószilárdite and redcanyonite – “represent a small and unique slice of the earth’s crust” where human activity spurred the formation of previously unknown materials.

“The only way to better understand the chemistry of uranium is to go out and find new minerals and describe their topology, their structures,” Olds says. “They teach us a lot about how uranium can then be moved in the environment.”